Calculate Your Odds of Winning the Lottery Mega Millions Powerball

Do you know how to calculate the odds of winning the lottery, including the Florida Lottery? You can calculate each set of odds for each different lottery game you play. With the assistance of a small hand held calculator or with the free calculator on your computer, you just multiply the numbers together and add one division process when “the order” of your chosen numbers is not required for a particular lottery game.

What you “need to know” is the number of total balls that the winning numbers are drawn from…..is it 59, 56, 42, 49, or 39? If there is a secondary drawing for the single extra ball, such as the “red ball” with Powerball or the Mega Millions’ “gold ball” you need to know how many balls are in this group as well. Are there 49 or 39?

It doesn’t matter if it is the Florida, Ohio, Texas, PA or NJ Lottery. This strategy or formula gives you the true odds. Florida Lottery is 6/53. New York Lottery is 6/59. The Ohio Lottery, Massachusetts Lottery, Wisconsin Lottery, and the State of Washington Lottery carry a 6/49 lottery numbers ratio. Illinois Lottery carries a 6/52.

Once you have this information correctly in front of you and your calculator in hand, you can start working the formulas. You need to choose five regular balls and one extra ball correctly matched to the winning drawn numbers to win the multi-million dollar jackpot that most of us dream about winning someday.

In the first example there are 56 balls in the first group and 46 balls in the secondary group. In order to win the Jackpot you need to match all these balls (5 + 1) exactly, but not necessarily in order. The California Lottery’s Super Lotto Plus is 47/27. The big drum is spinning with the initial part of the drawing. You have a 1/56 chance to match your number to this first ball.

With one ball removed after the first number has been drawn, you now have a 1/55 chance of matching another one of your numbers to the second ball drawn. With each drawn number a ball is removed lowering the number of remaining balls by a total of one.

The odds of you correctly matching the number on the third ball to be drawn is now 1/54 from the total number of balls remaining in the drum. With the third ball removed from the drum and sitting with the other two winning numbers, your odds of correctly matching the fourth ball is reduced to 1/53.

As you can see each time a ball is released from the drum the odds are reduced by one. You started with a 1/56 chance, then with each new winning number it is reduced to 1/55, 1/54, 1/53, and with the fifth ball you have the odds of 1/52 correctly matching this fifth winning number. This is the first part of the formula of how to calculate your odds of winning the lottery, including the Florida Lottery.

Now take these five odds representing the five winning numbers (1/56, 1/55, 1/54, 1/53, and 1/52). The “1” on top of the fraction represents your one and only chance to correctly match the drawn number.

Now you take your calculator and multiply all top numbers (1x1x1x1x1) equal one (1). Next you multiply all the bottom numbers (56x55x54x53x52). Correctly entered and multiplied you discover the total is 458,377,920. The new fraction becomes 1/458,377,920. This is a 458 million to one chance to win. If you were required to pick the numbers in order just like they are drawn, then these would be the odds against you to win this Pick 5/56 ball lottery game.

Fortunately or unfortunately, you are not required to pick the numbers in the exact order they are drawn. The second step of the formula will reduce the odds, which allows you to match these five winning numbers in any order. In this step you will multiply the number of balls drawn — five (1x2x3x4x5). With calculator in hand you see that the total equals 120.

To give you the right to choose your five matching numbers in any order, you create these odds by dividing 120/417,451,320. You definitely need a calculator for this one. 120/458,377,920 reduces your odds of winning this lottery to 1/3,819,816. These are over 3.5 million to one odds against you of winning this Pick 5/56 ball lottery game.

If this were the Mega Millions Lottery, you need to add the “gold ball” to these five winning drawn balls in order to win the Multi-Million Dollar Jackpot. The single gold ball is calculated as a 1/46 chance of matching it correctly, and since you are drawing just one number it has to be an exact match. Again, you only have that “1” chance to do it right. Now you need to multiply 3,819,816 by 46.

Grab your calculator and do the multiplication. Your final odds against you winning the Mega Millions Jackpot are calculated to be 175,711,536 or clearly stated 175 million, 711 thousand, 5 hundred 36 thirty-six to one (175,711,536 to 1). Now you know how to calculate the odds of winning the Mega Millions Lottery.

The Powerball Lottery calculations are based on a 1/59 for the first five white balls and 1/39 for the “red” power ball. The first set of multipliers is 59x58x57x56x55. This group totals 600,766,320. Now divide 600,766,360 by 120 (1x2x3x4x5). Your new total is 5,006,386. There is a 1/39 chance to catch the “red” ball. 39 x 5,006,386 gives you the real odds of winning the Powerball Jackpot, namely 195,249,054 to 1.

Another 5 +1 Lottery that seems to be everywhere in the United States is the “Hot Lotto” which has a 39/19 count. It is played in 15 different States. DC Lottery, Delaware Lottery, Idaho Lottery, Iowa Lottery, Kansas Lottery, Maine Lottery, Minnesota Lottery, Montana Lottery, New Hampshire Lottery, New Mexico Lottery, North Dakota Lottery, Oklahoma Lottery, South Dakota Lottery, Vermont Lottery, and the West Virginia Lottery. The final odds of winning the minimum $1 Million Jackpot is 10,939,383 to 1.

A Pick 6/52 ball Lottery game formula looks like this: (1/52, 1/51, 1/50, 1/49, 1/48, 1/47) for a total of 14,658,134,400 divided by 720 (1x2x3x4x5x6) for the odds of 1/20,358,520. Your chance to win the 6/52 Lottery is over 14.5 million to one to win, such as the Illinois Lotto.

The Hoosier Lottery that uses Indiana State’s nickname, carries a 6/48. Michigan Lottery is 6/47, Arizona Lottery and Missouri Lottery are 6/44, Maryland Lottery is 6/43, and Colorado Lottery is 6/42. Compare this to the Florida Lottery.

A Pick 5/39 ball Lottery game formula looks like this: (1/39, 1/38, 1/37, 1/36, 1/35) for a total of 69,090,840 divided by 120 (1x2x3x4x5) for the odds of 1/575,757 of winning the Jackpot such as the Illinois Little Lotto. Other States with the same 5/39 lottery numbers include the NC Lottery, Georgia and Florida Lottery Fantasy 5, and Tennessee Lottery’s Pick 5. Virginia Lottery’s Cash 5 carries a 5/34 range.

Now, isn’t it better to choose a Lottery game with lower odds against you?

Three Strange Criminal Law Stories From Florida

As a follower of and writer about the criminal law, this author often reports on strange criminal law stories from the State of Florida. Here are a few of my favorite vintage stories I would like to share with a wider world.

Orange County. Florida: Veteran’s Day weekend, 2010, the Orange County Sheriff’s Department became a national laughingstock when it was reported that sheriff deputies and members of the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation carried out a series of warrantless raids against local Orlando barbershops that made history for arresting 35 people on misdemeanor charges of “barbering without a license,” after having spent several months investigating the matter. A records check revealed that in the last ten years only three people in the entire state of Florida had been sent to jail on such charges. In the instant cases, many of the warrantless sweeps entailed officers swarming the barbershops that had children inside and putting the barbers in handcuffs and “perp walking” them to police vehicles. At least one felony arrest was made when one of the raids netted a barber with an unlicensed handgun. We learn further that all the barbershops were in the African American and Hispanic neighborhoods.

This startling report makes one wonder whether those neighborhoods are known for being hotbeds of “criminal barbering?”

New Port Richey, Florida: This strange story is also from 2010. As many of you know, “Four Loko” is a caffeinated alcoholic drink. A New Port Richey man drank four bottles and then went on a naked rampage. Police report that the 21-year-old man ran barefooted out of the back of his home to a house a few blocks away, smashed a sliding glass door and ransacked the home. He next took off his clothes, defecated on the floor and ripped the oven door off its hinges, according to Pasco County deputies. At another house a woman arrived home to find the naked man smeared with blood, sleeping on her couch. She called 911. According to a report, when deputies arrived, the man allegedly said: “Why am I being arrested? I didn’t steal anything.” He was charged with two counts of burglary.

The headline to this little story could have read: “Loko Gone Loco.” It is probably best to stay away from this dangerous product.

Hernando County Jail, Florida: 2011. Strange things happen in jail. A jail inmate in Hernando County didn’t have enough honeybuns to pay off a gambling debt and was paid off with a punch in the face. The inmate admitted he lost a football bet with a fellow prisoner. The loser of the bet said he went to bet winner’s cell to give him the bear claws he owed him, but he was short four honeybuns. The bet winner was not happy about being stiffed on the bet and punched the loser so hard that he had to be hospitalized. Yes, the winner of the bet and the puncher. was arrested on a battery charge.

If this had been casino gambling the bet loser could have wagered: I’ll see your one bear claw and raise you four honeybuns…

NCAA College Football Pointspread

We’ve all seen them, those extremely large college football pointspreads. Maybe USC is favored by 36 over some joke of a team. Or Florida is favored by 29 over Florida A&M. These games jump off the page right away just for the sheer size of the spread.

And yeah they nearly make you snicker because they’re such a joke, but what about really betting on these games where spreads can now and again make 40 points or more? Should you try to get down on a game with a spread this big?

The short response is no, but there are a number of reasons why. First of all, when you’re talking about spreads of this size that means you’re also talking about some REALLY bad teams. And we’ve all been there, but no one likes to have to root in a very bad team. One more sack allowed, an added turnover, an additional missed tackle, it’s like the movie ‘Groundhog Day,’ error after mistake.

A different trouble is there’s no real precedent to track. How can you decide if the team getting pounded will keep on working, playing tough to the final gun goes off, and trying to get that score that makes the number?

Now with the BCS involved, some schools will show no mercy because they’re trying to obtain those all- powerful points in the polls. You would believe that would increase even more later on in the season, right? Well even that theory isn’t a lock based on earlier performances.

And that’s my final and perhaps most imperative point. The statistical facts doesn’t validate taking either side in these lopsided games. Looking at the data we could only get hold of one instance where teams covered with a winning betting percentage [http://www.squidoo.com/bettingpercentage] over 53%. With a break-even point of 52.7%, that’s hardly enough to motivate assurance.

My counsel: stay away from the Giant NCAA Pointspread!

All the best,

Rich Allen – aka Sports Betting Professor

Gulfstream Park

Gulfstream Park in Hallandale Beach, Florida first opened to the public in 1939. It was only open for four days that year, but it attracted 18,000 people on opening day. Gulfstream opened again in 1944 for a 20 day meet and hasn’t missed a season since. This track has seen its share of great horses, including the likes of Swaps, Nashua, Bold Ruler, Kelso, Spectacular Bid and Cigar.

But the single theme that has run through the history of Gulfstream Park is change. By 1946, Gulfstream added the Gulfstream Park Handicap. 1952 not only added the Florida Derby, but construction began on a clubhouse and the grandstand was expanded. As the spectators enjoyed seeing the Swaps set a new world record in 1956 and watching Bold Ruler get defeated by General Duke in 1957, plans were in the works to add a world-class turf track to the facilities. The new track was finished in 1959.

1961 saw the addition of the largest tote board in the world to the track infield. Of course, it wouldn’t be considered the world’s largest by today’s standards, but in 1961, it was very grand. In the 1970s, the changes were more subtle. The Florida Derby became the state’s richest race when the purse was raised to $125,000. In 1978, the president of Gulfstream Park, James Donn, Jr., passed away. His son, Doug Donn, was elected as his replacement.

In 1982, renovations were performed on the clubhouse and grandstand. A new domed dining terrace was added known as the Gulfdome, providing a beautiful area to dine. In 1989, Gulfstream hosted the 6th Breeders’ Cup as a mini event lasting three days.

In 1990, another change happened when Gulfstream was purchased by Bertram and Diana Firestone, the owners of Calder Race Course. A banner event this year at the track was the final win in William Shoemaker’s long, illustrious career as a jockey. 1992 found the Park hosting another Breeders’ Cup, which broke the North American record for the amount of money bet in a single day. In 1995 and 1996, Gulfstream saw many of the amazing wins by the highest money making horse in the country, Cigar. He was added to the Park’s Garden of Champions upon his retirement, and a lifesize statue was erected in his honor. 1999 saw the last change in ownership for the track, when it was acquired by Magna Entertainment Corporation. Gulfstream was also host to another Breeders’ Cup, breaking another wagering record.

As soon as the meet ended in 2004, major renovation was begun at Gulfstream Park. The clubhouse and grandstand were leveled and the main track was enlarged to a mile and an eighth. The turf course was widened, growing from 80 feet to 170 feet. The walking ring was destroyed as well as half the barns and the Garden of Champions. The only original buildings left were the tote board, the administration building and the jockey’s room. The 2005 meet was held with tents and temporary buildings. This continued into 2006, since the 2005 hurricane season interfered with construction.

The new grandstand and clubhouse is elegant and includes retail space, restaurants and casinos, including the 1,200 seat restaurant, the Ten Palms, and the Tickets sports bar. A new walking ring surrounded by Mediterranean style architecture has been built. Gulfstream Park has remade itself almost completely to meet the needs of its many visitors.